Norman Rockwell Museum

 

Hours

Norman Rockwell Museum is Open 7 days a week year-round

May – October and holidays:

open daily: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Thursdays: 10 a.m. - 7 p.m. (July/August 2015)
Rockwell’s Studio open May through October.

November – April: open daily:

Weekdays: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Weekends and holidays: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Holiday Closings:

The Museum is Closed Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day

 

 

 

Admission

Members: FREE
Adults: $18.00
Seniors (65+): $17.00
College students with ID: $10.00
Children/teens 6 — 18: $6.00
Children 5 and under: FREE

Official Museum Website

www.nrm.org

 

 

 

Directions

Norman Rockwell Museum
9 Route 183
Stockbridge, MA 01262

413-298-4100 x 221

Rockwell Center Fellowships 2017-05-18T11:21:23+00:00
Detail, Howard Pyle (1853-1911); My hatred of him seemed suddenly to have taken to itself wings , 1890 Illustration for Harold Frederic’s “In the Valley” in Scribner’s Magazine v.8 (July 1890): 93 and in Harold Frederic, In the Valley (New York: Scribner’s, 1890) and in F. Hopkinson Smith, American Illustrations (New York: Scribner’s, 1892); Oil on board; Norman Rockwell Museum, gift of Lila Berle, NRM.2000.04

Detail, Howard Pyle (1853-1911); My hatred of him seemed suddenly to have taken to itself wings , 1890
Illustration for Harold Frederic’s “In the Valley” in Scribner’s Magazine v.8 (July 1890): 93 and in Harold Frederic, In the Valley (New York: Scribner’s, 1890) and in F. Hopkinson Smith, American Illustrations (New York: Scribner’s, 1892); Oil on board; Norman Rockwell Museum, gift of Lila Berle, NRM.2000.04

 

THE ROCKWELL CENTER FOR AMERICAN VISUAL STUDIES

The Rockwell Center for American Visual Studies at the Norman Rockwell Museum is the nation’s first research institute dedicated to the integrative study of American illustration and its impact in our world. The Rockwell Center’s goal is to enhance and support scholarship relating to this significant public art form, exploring the power of published images and their integral role in society, culture, and history, and the world of art―from the emergence of printed mass media in the mid nineteenth century to the innovations of digital media today.

Fellowship and Internship Opportunities for 2017

 
The Rockwell Center for American Visual Studies at the Norman Rockwell Museum is the nation’s first research institute dedicated to the integrative study of illustration and its impact in our world. The Rockwell Center’s goal is to enhance and support scholarship relating to this significant public art form, exploring the power of published images and their integral role in society, culture, and history, and the world of art―from the emergence of printed mass media in the mid nineteenth century to the innovations of digital media today.

We invite applications from academic scholars and curators for participation in the following programs, which are designed to advance research and access relating to this influential but understudied aspect of American visual culture.
 

chest-illustrationRockwell Center Society of Fellows 2017

Serious Thinking About Popular Pictures

Problems in the History and Criticism of Printed Images

Cultural engagement with the history of popular images has accelerated in the 21st century. There is a growing awareness that illustration and comics have mattered more in the cultural history of the modern period than has been properly recognized, and museum curators and academics have begun to work with popular materials to a greater degree than before. Institutional developments have paralleled rising interest in these topics.

And yet, despite increased engagement, the critical focus of most work has tended to be local, biographical and analytically underdeveloped. The Rockwell Center, in consultation with other institutional and critical participants in these somewhat inchoate fields, recognizes a methodological vacuum at the heart of popular image studies. Ideological biases and a lack of critical material continues to compromise our understanding of visual culture in a social context, which results in an incomplete view of our shared cultural history.

To address this critical lacuna, the Rockwell Center envisions a two-year project designed to bring leading thinkers and fresh perspectives to the study of published images, with the goal of producing a series of foundational statements of the emerging field, delivered via a broadcast symposia and published and digital volumes. The group will be convened twice a year, engaged in discussion and debate, and charged to pose and answer key questions for what may be an emerging discipline.

 

Illustration as Social Text

Despite their seeming invisibility to serious commentators, popular images and the social texts in which they were embedded (e.g., The Ladies’ Home Journal, the Saturday Evening Post, Sports Illustrated) contributed to their audiences’ sense of the culture in which they lived. How can such sources add to our understanding of the modern period?

Hierarchies and Exclusions

Aesthetic judgments have had an enormous impact on definitions of culture. They have insulated high culture from certain forms of scrutiny, but more importantly they have retarded serious cultural thinking about popular forms. In which ways do hierarchical distinctions offer valuable distinctions of persisting value? How may the democratic values of popular culture be rehabilitated for another era?

Useful Taxonomies

Due to the highly local, disparate and atomized character of much writing on popular images, we lack shared taxonomy and vocabulary for description and analysis. How might this problem be solved? Should it be, during an era of intellectual history that tends to prize the fluid and suspect the fixed?

Anonymity and Authorship

The lionization of authorship and cult of singular artistry has caused work of obvious cultural relevance to be shunted aside, or to be discussed as if no particular person or community of production created it. How can we overcome the cult of the creator while simultaneously respecting and interrogating communities of production in the absence of clear credits?

Canonical and Historiographical Questions

We are in need of reflection on whether and how to settle on sets of indispensably important practitioners. How do we speak of significance? Is there such a thing as the history of American illustration, or put another way, can there be a historiography of American illustration? How do the related fields of comics, cartooning and animated film participate in such narratives?

Languages of Formation & Visual Analysis

Humanists often engage popular images without proper visual training. Close looking is essential for successful encounters with images and objects, especially popular sources “hidden in plain sight.” Why and how might familiarity with production methods matter? What approaches to training scholars in close looking might be imported from art and design training and/or art historical study?

 

 

 The Rockwell Center for American Visual Studies seeks to engage a group of scholars and critics to explore, debate and write on key problems in the history and criticism of the popular printed image in the United States between 1850 and the present. The Center launches this effort to catalyze the creation of founding documents in the study of illustration and illustrated materials, an underdeveloped field.

 

Fellows will be expected to: meet twice annually; write one targeted paper per year; engage in dialogue with other Fellows; participate in a symposia or program; contribute to a privately maintained blog; and permit the Rockwell Center to publish designated works in order to disseminate the results of the seminar.

 

Application/Statement of Interest

The Center seeks to attract candidates for the seminar program with substantial experience and demonstrated interest in the study of and/or engagement with modern cultural production. Scholars, critics, curators and practitioners with at least five years of experience in their field are invited to apply. Demonstrated ability to engage with others in productive dialogue and exchange is required.

Fellows will receive a stipend of $5,000 per calendar year as well as travel expenses.

Interested parties should submit a statement of interest which responds to the Topics and Problems outlined above. Which areas are of interest to the candidate, and why? The Statement of Interest should not exceed 1000 words. In addition to the Statement of Interest, the application should include a cover letter, a current CV, a writing sample, and a list of three referees.

Senior Fellow/Project Leader
Douglas B. Dowd
Professor of Art and American Culture Studies
Sam Fox School of Design and Dowd Modern Graphic History Library, Washington University in St. Louis

Please send applications to:
Jana Purdy
Project Coordinator
Norman Rockwell Museum
jpurdy@nrm.org

Application Timeline:
June 2, 2017                          Applications Due
July 14, 2017                         Fellows Announced
October 2017                        Society of Fellows First Convening

 
 

woman-and-stickRockwell Scholars Fellowship Program

The Rockwell Center for American Visual Studies awards annual fellowships promoting the scholarly study of American illustration art to advance understanding of the role of published images in shaping and reflecting culture. Rockwell Center Fellowships are open to senior scholars, advanced graduate students, and museum professionals choosing to pursue research or projects in or relating to the subject field of illustration art from diverse academic perspectives, including but not limited to Art History, American Studies, Visual Culture Studies, and History.

Rockwell Center Fellowships are awarded on an annual basis to four recipients

This fellowship may be used during the year/twelve month period for which it is awarded. The term of these grants may be carried out in residence at the Norman Rockwell Museum, the Fellow’s home institution, or at another appropriate site.

 

Fellows will receive a stipend of $1,500 in support of their work.

Rockwell Center Senior Fellowships are intended for scholars with a distinguished publication record who hold a doctoral degree, or who possess an equivalent record of professional accomplishment at the time of application.

Rockwell Center Dissertation Fellowships are open to doctoral candidates who are currently working on dissertation research or writing in or relating to the field of American illustration art and visual studies.

Rockwell Center Fellow Application Requirements

Senior Fellow and Dissertation Fellow Applicants Should:

Offer a proposal for scholarly research focused on or relating to a topic about American illustration art or referencing published images. Although the topic may be historically and/or theoretically grounded, attention to the art object and/or image should be foremost. Projects must be object and/or culturally oriented, employing art historical or visual studies approaches.

Applications should include:

  • Completed application form (available at www.rcavs.org)
  • Research proposal (up to five pages, double spaced)
  • Research bibliography
  • Selected images
  • Curriculum vitae
  • Two letters of reference

 

 
 

The Walt Reed Distinguished Scholar Internship

The Rockwell Center for American Visual Studies offers a named, paid internship in honor of illustration historian, gallery owner, and author Walt Reed in recognition of Mr. Reed’s lifelong commitment to scholarship relating to the art of illustration. This internship provides a unique opportunity for third and fourth year college and graduate level students interested in pursuing arts and museum careers to gain practical experience within a nationally accredited organization dedicated to the art of illustration in all its variety.

The intern will spend eight to ten weeks focusing on a project or projects established within the Curatorial/Exhibitions Department. The internship requires at least a four-day-a-week commitment including occasional weekend days.

The intern will receive a stipend of $2,500 in support of their work.

 Application Timeline:
March 6, 2017                                     Applications Due
May 26, 2017                                      Walt Reed Internship Announced
Summer 2017                                      Internship Period

 Send Applications for All Programs Attention To:
Stephanie Haboush Plunkett
Deputy Director/Chief Curator, Norman Rockwell Museum
splunkett@nrm.org; 413-298-4100, ext. 208

 

Fellowship Recipients

 

Dr. Alexia L. Boylan

Assistant Professor, Joint Appointment in the Art History Department and the Women’s Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program, University of Connecticut

Research topic: Shinn and his Salamander

 

Dr. Alan Lupack and Dr. Barbara Tepa Lupack (joint application)

Alan Lupack is the Director of the Robbins Library & Adjunct Professor of English at the University of Rochester; Dr. Barbara Tepa Lupack is currently an independent scholar and formerly an Academic Dean, SUNY/ESC

Research topic: “Visions of Courageous Achievement”: Moral Chivalry and American Arthurian Illustration in the Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries

 

Jennifer Stettler Parsons

University of Virginia; McIntire Department of Art

Dissertation title: “John Sloan: Between Philadelphia and New York, 1892-1904”

 

Senior Scholar Fellowships

Dr. James J. Kimble

Associate Professor at Seton Hall University in the Department of Communication and the Arts

Research topic: “Character Sketches: The Strange War Careers of Willie Gillis, the Kid in Upper 4, and Al Parker’s Mother and Daughter

 

Dr. Michael Clapper

Professor at Franklin & Marshall College, Department of Art and Art History

Research topic: “Maxfield Parrish: Popular Art as Fantasy and Commodity”

 

Ms. Andrea Truitt

University of Minnesota; Department of Art History

Dissertation title: “Exotic Interiors, Exotic Selves: Orientalized Domestic Space in the United States, 1880-1920”

 

Erin Corrales-Diaz

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Department of Art

Dissertation title: “Remembering the Veteran: Disability, Trauma, and the American Civil War, 1861-1915

 

Dr. John Ott

Associate Professor of Art History, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA

Topic: “Graphic Consciousness: The Visual Culture and Institutions of the Industrial Labor Movement at Midcentury

 

Emily A. Schiller

Ph.D. candidate at Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

Dissertation Topic: Unsettled Masses: Transportation in American Art During the 1930s and 1940s

 

Bryna R. Campbell

Ph.D. candidate at Washington University in St. Louis, MO

Dissertation Topic: Bodies in Crisis: The Comic Grotesque in American Caricature of the 1930s

 

Ranelle Lueth

Ph.D. candidate at University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA

Dissertation Topic: Conflicting Lines: World War I Combat Artists and Their Works

 

Dr. Michael Lobel

Professor of Art History in Modern and Contemporary Art, Criticism, and Theory, School of Humanities at Purchase College, State University of New York, Purchase, NY

Topic: “Becoming an Artist: John Sloan, the Ashcan School, and Popular Illustration”

 

S. Jaleen Grove

Ph.D. candidate at the State University of New York at Stonybrook, Long Island ,NY

Dissertation Topic:  A Cultural Trade: Canadian Commercial Illustration at Home and in the United States