Norman Rockwell Museum

 

Hours

Norman Rockwell Museum is Open 7 days a week year-round

May – October and holidays:

open daily: 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Thursdays: 10 a.m. - 7 p.m. (July/August 2015)
Rockwell’s Studio open May through October.

November – April: open daily:

Weekdays: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Weekends and holidays: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Holiday Closings:

The Museum is Closed Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day

 

 

 

Admission

Members: FREE
Adults: $18.00
Seniors (65+): $17.00
College students with ID: $10.00
Children/teens 6 — 18: $6.00
Children 5 and under: FREE

Official Museum Website

www.nrm.org

 

 

 

Directions

Norman Rockwell Museum
9 Route 183
Stockbridge, MA 01262

413-298-4100 x 221

About JKSchiller

Curator, Rockwell Center for American Visual Studies

Witches Night Out

Owen Smith (b. 1964) Halloween New Yorker, 2000 Cover illustration for The New Yorker (November 6, 2000)   Halloween, or All Hallows Eve,  is one of the times that harmful spirits are said to be active. In the U.S., we take that concept to mean that witches, among other spirits, are out that night seeing what mischief they can get into. Since we link witches and Halloween together, it is not uncommon to see Halloween cover illustrations for popular magazines that show a witch out riding her broom, like Owen Smith’s New Yorker cover seen here.

By | November 18th, 2014|Essays on Illustration|0 Comments

August 26

On this day, August 26, 1901, illustrator Earle K. Bergey was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He studed at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts and then went to work for Philadelphia’s Public Ledger. Bergey is best remembered for his pulp-fiction cover art, comic book cover art, and glamour illustrations.

By | August 26th, 2014|News, On This Day|0 Comments

August 25

On this day, August 25, 1959, illustrator and children's book author Ian Woodward Falconer was born in Ridgefield, Connecticut. He studied art history at New York University, and art at Parsons School of Design and the Otis Art Institute. In addition to creating a variety of Olivia story books, Falconer has also produced theater set designs

By | August 24th, 2014|News, On This Day|0 Comments

August 24

On this day, August 24, 1886, illustrator Walter Haskell Hinton was born in San Francisco, California. Hinton studied art at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. In addition to cover illustration art and pulp illustration art, Hinton also produced advertising images for tractor company John Deere and images for Brown and Bigelow calendars.

By | August 24th, 2014|News, On This Day|0 Comments

August 23

On this day, August 23, 1953, artist and graphic designer F. Winold Reiss died in New York City. German born, Reiss immigrated to the U. S. in 1913. His illustration work includes graphically dynamic WWI war posters; interpretations of Harlem Jazz and Steel Workers; illustrations for Alain Locke’s book The New Negro; and this cover illustration

By | August 23rd, 2014|News, On This Day|0 Comments

August 22

On this day, August 22, 1880, cartoonist George Herriman was born in New Orleans, Louisiana. When he was ten his family moved to Los Angeles. By the age of 17, and after high school Herriman worked as an illustrator and engraver for the Los Angeles Herald-Examiner. In 1913 Herriman's best known strip Krazy Kat was created.

By | August 22nd, 2014|News, On This Day|0 Comments

August 21

On this day, August 21, 1929, comic book artist and colorist Marie Severin was born in East Rockaway, New York. She studied for a short time at Pratt Institute in Brooklyn. Severin began working for EC Comics as a colorist in the late 40s. She also worked for Marvel Comics in production. Severin was Marvel’s head

By | August 20th, 2014|News, On This Day|0 Comments

The End

The illustrator Howard Pyle understood the essential elements of imagining the termination of a life or illustrating the passage of a lifetime. In the vignette seen below, he pictured an artist (himself really) seated under his umbrella painting the ruins of Fort Ticonderoga en plein air—in the open air. Standing behind the artist is the spirit of Ethan Allan, bearing witness to the past of the fort while watching over the artist recreating that life. In this scene fragment, Pyle ruminated about how the past influences the hand of the present.     Howard Pyle (1853-1911) Untitled Vignette, 1896 oil on board Delaware Art Museum , gift of Marion Mahony Manning in memory of Mary Poole Mahony, DAM 1991-165

By | August 20th, 2014|Essays on Illustration|0 Comments

August 20

On this day, August 20, 1880, illustrator Walter Hunt Everett was born in Haddonfield, New Jersey. Everett studied at the Howard Pyle School of Art in Wilmington, Delaware and as early as 1904 began providing illustrations for The Saturday Evening Post. Everett also established the illustration department at the Philadelphia Museum School of Industrial Art.

By | August 19th, 2014|News, On This Day|0 Comments

August 19

On this day, August 19, 1877, illustrator Frank Earle Schoonover was born in Oxford, New Jersey. Instead of entering the ministry as his parents had wanted, Schoonover studied with Howard Pyle at Drexel Institute in Philadelphia. Like other Pyle students, Schoonover often travelled to the places he would illustrate, giving his illustration work a grounding in

By | August 19th, 2014|News, On This Day|0 Comments